Objectivity/DB Administration : Tool Summary : Tool Syntax
Tool Syntax
This chapter describes the command-line conventions for executing tools and scripts.
Tool Runner Syntax
The tool runner is a command-line mechanism for executing the majority of the general administration tools and tools for placement-related tasks.
Tools that can be executed through the tool runner:
Accept Unicode strings as input.
Can also be invoked from applications using selected Objectivity/DB programming interfaces.
The general syntax for running a tool using the tool runner is as follows:
objy toolName optionList
where optionList may contain any number of options of the form -option or -option  value
Example Use tool runner syntax for the License command:
objy License -fromDefault -bootFile myData
 
Getting Help From the Tool Runner
You can obtain a list of tools that are available through the tool runner. To do so:
At a command prompt, enter:
objy 
You can obtain a list of options for a particular tool as follows:
At a command prompt, enter:
objy toolName -help 
Tool Runner Usage Hints
The names of tool-runner based tools do not have the oo prefix.
You can specify a tool option by typing only as many letters as are necessary to identify it uniquely. (You must spell out the complete toolName, however.)
The toolName and its options are not case sensitive. For example, all of the following are valid:
objy CreateFd -fdName myData
objy createfd -fdname myData
objy CREATEFD -FDNAME myData
The name of the tool runner itself (objy) must be all lowercase.
Classic Command-Line Syntax
The classic command-line syntax for Objectivity/DB tools includes either or both of the following:
Options, which modify the way the tool works.
Syntactically, options are characters prefixed with a hyphen and set off with spaces—for example, -help.
Some options are followed by values—for example, -host hostName.
Arguments, which specify values directly to the tool. For example, many tools accept a bootFilePath argument.
Example Use classic command-line syntax for the oocheck command:
oocheck -db myDB myFD
 
Hints for Using Classic Command-Line Syntax
Options and arguments are case sensitive, usually all lower case.
Note:Be sure to type options and arguments using the correct case.
The names of the basic-syntax tools generally have the oo prefix, and are the same on all platforms.
The names of the executables have an extension (.exe) on Windows.
You can specify an option by typing only as many letters of the option as are necessary to identify it uniquely. This is also true for the fixed values sometimes associated with a command name or option.
Script Syntax
You execute scripts from a shell prompt.
A script’s syntax includes either or both of the following:
Options, which modify the way the tool works. Syntactically, options are characters prefixed with two hyphens and set off with spaces—for example, --data-dir.
Arguments, which specify values directly to the tool.
Options and arguments are case sensitive, usually all lower case.
Note:Be sure to type options and arguments using the correct case.