Objectivity/DB Administration : Tools for Administration Tasks
Tools for Administration Tasks
You use Objectivity/DB administration tools for performing a variety of general administration tasks. See also Tools for Placement-Related Tasks for descriptions of placement-related tools.
 
Backup
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Archives a federated database to a backup medium.
Backup
(([-full] | -incremental | -subincremental) [-destination backupDirPath] )
   | (-set setName -backupName backupName  -volume volName 
         -device deviceSpecifier [-backupLevel backupLevel])
[-capacity size]
[-procfiles programName]
[-quiet | -timestamp]
[-standalone | -lockWait]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
-bootFile backupBootFilePath
Options 
-full
Take a full backup of the specified federated database. This is the default if you omit the backup-level options -full, -incremental, and -subincremental.
This option may be used with the -destination option.
-incremental
Take an incremental backup of the specified federated database. An incremental backup records all changes made since the most recent full backup.
This option may be used with the -destination option.
-subincremental
Take a subincremental backup of the specified federated database. A subincremental backup records all changes made since the most recent incremental backup.
This option may be used with the -destination option.
-destination backupDirPath
Full path to the disk directory in which to write the backup files. The default is the current directory (the directory in which you are executing Backup).
This option may be used with the -full, -incremental, or -subincremental option.
-set setName
Name of the backup set that is to contain the backup event.
This option must be used with the -backupName, -volume, -device, and -backupLevel options.
-backupName backupName
Name of the backup event to be executed. The name must be unique within the scope of the backup set specified by setName.
This option must be used with the -set, -volume, -device, and -backupLevel options.
-volume volName
Volume name prefix. Each volume name consists of the volume name prefix plus a sequential numeric value. For example, if volName is myVol, the first volume of a federated database backup has the name myVol_1. The second volume has the name myVol_2. Multiple volumes are generated only if the backup size exceeds the backup capacity value.
This option must be used with the -set, -backupName, -device, and -backupLevel options.
-device deviceSpecifier
Full path to the disk directory in which to store the backup volumes. For example, if the value for deviceSpecifier is /dba/backups and the value for volName is fdb020492, then the actual disk filename for the first backup volume is /dba/backups/fdb020492_1.
This option must be used with the -set, -backupName, -volume, and -backupLevel options.
-backupLevel backupLevel
Backup level. Valid values are integers 0 through 9. The default level is 0, which executes a full backup.
This option must be used with the -set, -backupName, -volume, and -device options.
-capacity size
Capacity of each backup volume in kilobytes. The default is 1000 (1 MB).
-procfiles programName
Full or relative path to the shell script or program to be executed after each backup volume is written.
During the execution of Backup, the name of the backup volume just written and the total size in bytes of the backup volumes written so far are passed to the script as command-line arguments. If the script exits with a nonzero status, Backup reports an error and terminates immediately.
-quiet
Suppresses all normal program output.
You must omit this option if you specify -timestamp.
-timestamp
Includes the current date and time (hours:minutes:seconds) at the beginning of each progress message in the program output. You must omit this option if you specify -quiet.
-standalone
Nonconcurrent mode. Use this option if no lock server is running or to bypass a running lock server.
Warning: Corruption can occur if concurrent access to the federated database is attempted while any process is using this mode.
-noTitle
Suppresses the copyright notice and program title banner. Useful when invoking the tool from another tool or script.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile backupBootFilePath
Path to the backup boot file for the federated database to be archived. You must use the same boot file when restoring the federated database.
Discussion 
Depending on your requirements, you can perform:
A basic backup, where you simply specify one of three backup levels (-full, -incremental, or -subincremental) and the directory (-destination) in which to write the resulting backup files. Objectivity/DB automatically generates the names of all backup files and other administrative structures. If you omit all of the backup-level options, a full backup is taken.
A customized backup, where you can specify one of 10 backup levels (-backupLevel) and you must provide naming information for the backup files (-device and -volume) and other administrative structures (-set and -backupName).
You can use a combination of basic and customized backups to archive a given federated database:
A full backup (taken with -full) and is internally a level 0 backup.
An incremental backup (taken with -incremental) and is internally a level 3 backup.
A subincremental backup (taken with -subincremental) is internally a level 6 backup.
Some federated databases have multiple boot files—for example, a distributed federated database may require multiple copies of the boot file. When a federated database has multiple boot files, you must choose one specific boot file, called the backup boot file, to specify the federated database for both backup and restore operations.
If the size of the backup event exceeds the volume capacity, multiple backup volumes with the same volume name prefix are generated.
The Backup tool reports an error and terminates in any of the following cases:
You start Backup while another Backup process is running on the same federated database. You may perform only one backup on a federated database at a time.
You start Backup while a concurrent user application is in a transaction that created or deleted a container in the same federated database, and Backup times out while waiting for the transaction to end (abort, commit, or checkpoint). The timeout period is 10 minutes.
See also 
Restore
 
ChangeFd
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Lists and optionally changes the properties of a federated database.
objy ChangeFd
[-apName apSysName | -apId apId]
[-lockServerHost newLockServerHost]
[-fdNumber newFdId]
[[-newBootFileHost newBootFileHost]
-newBootFilePath newBootFilePath]
[[-sysFileHost newFileHost] -sysFilePath newFilePath
[-catalogOnly]]
[[-jnlDirHost newJnlDirHost] -jnlDirPath newJnlDirPath]
[-offline | -online]
[-weight weight]
[-readOnlySchema | -readWriteSchema]
[-lockWait seconds | -noWait | -standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-apName apSysName
(For backward compatibility only)
-apId apId
(For backward compatibility only)
-lockServerHost newLockServerHost
New lock-server host.
-fdNumber newFdId
(For backward compatibility only) Suggested new integer identifier for the federated database. The maximum identifier is 65533.
If the suggested identifier is found to be unique among the federated-database identifiers recognized by the lock server, it is used; otherwise Objectivity/DB selects a unique identifier to assign.
Note: If -standalone is also specified, Objectivity/DB cannot guarantee a unique identifier for the federated database.
-newBootFileHost newBootFileHost
New host for the boot file. To leave the host unchanged, omit both the -newBootFileHost and -newBootFilePath options.
If you omit only the -newBootFileHost option, the default host is:
The host on which you are running this tool, if -newBootFilePath specifies a local path.
The host implied by -newBootFilePath, if an NFS mount name is specified.
If -newBootFilePath specifies a Windows UNC share name, newBootFileHost is set to the literal string oo_local_host; any value you specify is ignored.
-newBootFilePath newBootFilePath
New path (including the filename) to the boot file on the designated host. To leave the path unchanged, omit both the -newBootFileHost and -newBootFilePath options. If the -newBootFileHost option designates a remote system, newBootFilePath must be full, not relative.
-sysFileHost newFileHost
New data-server host for the system-database file. To leave the host unchanged, omit both the -sysFileHost and -sysFilePath options. If you omit only the -sysFileHost option, the default host is:
The host on which you are running this tool, if -sysFilePath specifies a local path.
The host implied by -sysFilePath, if an NFS mount name is specified.
If -sysFilePath specifies a Windows UNC share name, newFileHost is set to the literal string oo_local_host; any value you specify is ignored.
-sysFilePath newFilePath
New path (including the filename) to the system-database file on the designated host. To leave the path unchanged, omit both the -sysFileHost and -sysFilePath options. If the -sysFileHost option designates a remote system, newFilePath must be full, not relative.
-catalogOnly
Updates the system database’s location properties in the federated database’s boot file and global catalog, without physically relocating the system-database file. This option is valid only in combination with the -sysFileHost and -sysFilePath options.
-jnlDirHost newJnlDirHost
New host for the federated database’s journal directory. To leave the host unchanged, omit both the -jnlDirHost and -jnlDirPath options. If you omit only the -jnlDirHost option, the default host is:
The host on which you are running this tool, if -jnlDirPath specifies a local path.
The host implied by -jnlDirPath, if an NFS mount name is specified.
If -jnlDirPath specifies a Windows UNC share name, jnlDirHost is set to the literal string oo_local_host; any value you specify is ignored.
-jnlDirPath newJnlDirPath
New path to the federated database’s journal directory. To leave the path unchanged, omit both the -jnlDirHost and -jnlDirPath options. If the -jnlDirHost option designates a remote system, jnlDirPath must be full, not relative.
-offline
(For backward compatibility only)
-online
(For backward compatibility only)
-weight weight
(For backward compatibility only)
-readOnlySchema
Changes the specified federated database’s schema so that it is read-only.
When a schema is read-only, no tool or application can modify the schema in any way; see Federated-Database Schema Policy. Any such attempt to modify the schema will report an error; you must change the schema back to read/write before you can run any tools or applications that will modify it.
-readWriteSchema
Changes the specified federated database’s schema back to read/write; see Federated-Database Schema Policy. The schema is created as read/write; you normally specify this option to restore the default behavior if you have previously disabled it with -readOnlySchema.
Note: This option has no effect if the schema was explicitly locked by an Objectivity/DB Active Schema application. A similar application must be used to unlock such a schema.
-lockWait seconds
Number of seconds to wait to obtain a lock. If you omit this option, the default is 10 seconds.
-noWait
Causes the tool to terminate immediately if the federated database is being accessed by another process.
-standalone
Strict nonconcurrent mode. Use this option only if the lock server for the specified federated database is stopped. If the lock server is running, the tool reports an error and terminates.
Note: When you use -fdNumber along with this option, Objectivity/DB cannot guarantee a unique identifier for the federated database.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database to be changed or listed.
Discussion 
To list the current properties of a federated database, enter ChangeFd with just the -bootFile option.
Note:You must specify a fully operational federated database. If necessary, use InstallFd to install the federated database before you attempt to change its properties.
To specify a new boot file location, use the -newBootFileHost and -newBootFilePath options. ChangeFd writes an updated boot file in the specified location, and leaves the old boot file as is. You delete the old boot file using appropriate operating-system commands.
To move or rename the system-database file, use the -sysFileHost and -sysFilePath options. By default, ChangeFd physically relocates the file in the file system. To make the change only logically (without relocating the system-database file), you add the -catalogOnly option. This is appropriate only if the file has been or will be moved by an operating-system command.
See also 
FileInfo
CheckAms
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Checks whether AMS is running on a particular data-server host.
objy CheckAms
[-host hostName]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
Options 
-host hostName
Name of the data-server host to be checked for AMS.
If you omit this option, the current host is checked.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
CheckLs
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Checks whether a lock server is running on a particular host system, and provides various information about the lock server.
objy CheckLs
[-host hostName]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
Options 
-host hostName
Name of the host system to be checked for a lock server.
If you omit this option, the current host is checked.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
This tool checks whether the specified host is running a lock server. The CheckLs output identifies the running lock server by its process name; a lock server is identified as ools or ools-xx, where xx is a number.
You can run this tool to see how many threads the lock server is using, and to find out whether the lock server’s recover monitor is enabled.
See also 
StartLockServer
CheckRESTServer
 
Checks whether the Objectivity REST server is running on the current host.
CheckRESTServer
[-port number]
[-help]
Options 
[-port number]
Port number on which to check for a running REST server. The default value is 8185.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
This tool checks for a REST server on the default port of 8185 if a port is not specified.
See also 
StartRESTServer
StopRESTServer
CleanupFd
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Lists the active transactions for a federated database; recovers some or all of the abnormally terminated transactions.
objy CleanupFd 
[-local [-process pId] | -transaction tId
     | -deadHost hostName]
[-resetLock]
[-force]
[-standalone]
[-allPart | -onePart]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-local
Recovers all transactions started by processes that are no longer active, provided CleanupFd can verify the status of these processes. Transactions are skipped if they belong to processes that are still active or whose status cannot be verified; see the -process option.
In general, CleanupFd can directly verify the status of all local processes. However, the status of a remote process cannot be verified if either the remote host or its network link has failed. CleanupFd with the -local option therefore recovers only those transactions belonging to inactive local processes or to remote processes that disconnected from the lock server due to application failure. (The -force option does not change this behavior.)
If the lock server has failed (and the -standalone option is used), only transactions from local processes are recovered.
-process pId
Used with the -local option; permits recovery of all transactions started by a specific process, regardless of the status of that process. You specify a process using the process identifier assigned to it by the operating system. The -process option enables you to recover the transactions of any process that -local skipped.
For safety, CleanupFd checks the status of the process with the specified process identifier. If the process is no longer active, all its incomplete transactions are recovered. Otherwise, if the process is active, CleanupFd displays a report and terminates; you can re-run the command with -force to proceed with the recovery.
Warning: Before using -force, verify that there are no process identifiers associated with active Objectivity/DB processes; otherwise, unintentional cleanup of an active process may result.
-transaction tId
Transaction identifier of a specific transaction to be recovered.
For safety, CleanupFd checks the status of the process that started the specified transaction. If the process is no longer active, the transaction is recovered. Otherwise, if the process is active or its status cannot be determined, CleanupFd displays a report and terminates; you can re-run the command with -force to proceed with the recovery.
Warning: You can corrupt the federated database by recovering a transaction that belongs to an active process.
-deadHost hostName
Recovers transactions started by processes on the specified host, provided the host is “dead” (has failed or lost its network link), so its processes are no longer active.
For safety, CleanupFd attempts to contact the specified host to verify that it is dead. If the host responds instead of timing out, CleanupFd displays a report and terminates; you can re-run the command with -force to proceed with the recovery.
Warning: Do not rely solely on this safety check to determine whether the specified host is dead. You can corrupt the federated database by recovering transactions that belong to active processes.
-resetLock
When used with -force, resets the recovery lock before recovering transactions. The -resetLock option is required if a previous invocation of CleanupFd terminated abnormally while recovering the transaction. An error is displayed if you do not include -force.
Warning: You can corrupt the federated database by using this option when a recovery lock belongs to a cleanup process that is still active.
-force
Used with the -process, -transaction, -deadHost, or -resetLock option; recovers the requested transaction(s) even if they belong to active processes.
Warning: You can corrupt the federated database by recovering a transaction that belongs to an active process.
Note: The -force option has no effect on the behavior of the -local option.
-standalone
Strict nonconcurrent mode. Use this option only if the lock server for the specified federated database is stopped. If the lock server is running, the tool reports an error and terminates.
-allPart
(For backward compatibility only)
-onePart
(For backward compatibility only)
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database whose transactions are to be listed or recovered.
Discussion 
You can use CleanupFd to accomplish these tasks:
To display a list of active update transactions on a particular federated database, specify just the -bootFile option.
To recover all incomplete transactions started by local processes that are no longer active, use the -local option. (This option also recovers transactions started by remote processes, but only if the status of these processes can be verified.) To recover all incomplete transactions started by a process that has been skipped by -local, run CleanupFd with the -process and -local options.
To recover a specific transaction, use the -transaction option.
To recover transactions while the lock server is stopped, use the -standalone option along with any other required CleanupFd options. Do not use -standalone while the lock server is running.
When the CleanupFd tool recovers a transaction, it rolls back the transaction’s uncommitted changes, restoring the federated database to the logical state it was in before the transaction started.
The CleanupFd tool uses the journal files of the specified federated database to identify the transactions to be listed or recovered. When just the -bootFile option is specified, the CleanupFd tool lists all active update transactions, including:
Transactions started by local processes (local to the host on which you are running CleanupFd).
Transactions started by remote processes (running on a host other than the host on which you are running CleanupFd).
From this list of transactions, CleanupFd with the -local option recovers all transactions started by processes that are no longer running, provided that their status can be verified by CleanupFd. (The status of a remote process cannot be verified if either the remote host or its network link has failed.)
If the lock server for the specified federated database is still running, CleanupFd causes it to release all locks held by the recovered transaction. If the lock server has stopped—or stopped and restarted—the transaction’s locks are lost, so CleanupFd just rolls back changes.
By default, CleanupFd acquires a recovery lock to make sure that no recovery is being performed by another CleanupFd process. If CleanupFd fails to acquire a recovery lock, it reports an error.
ConvertFormat
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Converts the specified container, database, or federated database so that its storage pages use the specified disk format.
objy ConvertFormat 
(-db dbSysName [-cont contSysName] | -id oid | -fd | -all)
[-check]
[-format newArch]
[-from oldArch]
[-showTidy]
[-listArchitectures]
[-convertObjects]
[-verbose]
[-lockWait seconds | -standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-db dbSysName
System name of the database to be converted.
-cont contSysName
System name of the container to be converted. If you use this option, you must also use the -db option to specify the database that contains this container. If you use this option, you cannot use the -id, -fd, or -all option. If contSysName contains spaces, you must enclose it in double-quote (" ") characters.
-id oid
Identifier of the database or container to be converted. You can specify:
The integer identifier of a database (for example, 78). This option also accepts the identifier specified in D-C-P-S format (for example, 78-0-0-0).
The object identifier in D-C-P-S format of a container (for example, 78-16-1-1).
If you use this option, you cannot use the -db, -cont, -fd, or -all option.
-fd
Converts just the system database. (HA) If the federated database is partitioned, all images of the system database are converted.
-all
Converts the entire federated database, including the system database and every database.
-check
Reports the number of storage pages whose disk format would be changed. No format conversion is actually performed.
-format newArch
New owning architecture for the specified storage pages in the container, database, or federated database being converted. This architecture defines the disk format that will be used by these pages after conversion. If you omit this option, the default is the architecture of the host on which you are running this tool.
The newArch value must be an architecture name recognized by Objectivity/DB. For a list of the recognized architectures, run this tool with the -help option.
Note:
The recognized names for the supported Windows architectures are win32 (for the 32-bit addressing mode) and win64 (for the 64-bit addressing mode).
The recognized names for the supported Linux architectures are available on the Objectivity Developer Network (with the information about supported configurations).
Note: When converting from a 32-bit to a 64-bit architecture, some persistent objects might no longer fit in their original storage space due to an increase in the class’s size. Such an object is automatically redirected to a page with more space, and a link to its new location is maintained by a redirection stub left in the original location.
-from oldArch
Current owning architecture of the storage pages to be changed in the container, database, or federated database being converted. If different pages are owned by different architectures, only the pages currently owned by oldArch will be changed to the disk format defined by newArch. If you omit this option, the default is to change any storage page that is not already owned by newArch, regardless of its current owning architecture.
The oldArch value must be an architecture name recognized by Objectivity/DB, as described for the -format option.
The special value none suppresses disk-format conversion. This is useful if want to perform only object conversion (with the -convertObjects option).
-showTidy
Lists the databases that should be tidied after conversion.
-listArchitectures
Prints a list of supported architectures to the screen.
-convertObjects
Performs object conversion on any objects affected by prior schema evolution. Omitting this option converts the disk format of storage pages without performing object conversion on any affected objects.
(Objectivity/C++) This option releases any marked classes from upgrade protection, if necessary, before converting objects in an entire federated database.
-verbose
Includes additional detail in the program output.
-lockWait seconds
Number of seconds to wait to obtain a lock. If you omit this option, the default is 10 seconds.
-standalone
Strict nonconcurrent mode. Use this option only if the lock server for the specified federated database is stopped. If the lock server is running, the tool reports an error and terminates.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database containing the storage pages to be converted.
Discussion 
This tool changes the disk format of storage pages by specifying a new owning architecture for those pages; see Disk Format of Storage Pages.
By default, this tool causes the architecture on which it is running to be the new owning architecture of all storage pages in the specified container, database, or federated database. You can add the -format option to specify a different owning architecture.
You can add the -from option to change only those storage pages currently owned by a particular architecture. For example, you might want to change just the pages owned by a particular Linux architecture so they are owned by another Linux architecture, without affecting any pages owned by a Windows architecture.
Changing the disk format of a storage page has no effect on the object identifiers (OID) of persistent objects on the page—that is, no logical page numbers or slot numbers are changed.
If you specify multiple containers (for example, by specifying a database), each container is processed in a separate update transaction; the transaction for one container commits before the next one begins. Consequently, ConvertFormat locks at most one container at a time, and conversion can take place while concurrent applications are running. After processing each container, this tool reports the container’s identifier, the number of converted pages, and the number of pages that did not need converting.
You can use the -lockWait option to specify how long ConvertFormat should wait for an update lock on each container. If this tool cannot obtain a lock on a particular container, the container is skipped, an error is reported, and the next container is processed.
Changing the disk format of a storage page creates a new version of the page and deletes the original version. For best space usage, you should eliminate the resulting unused free space by tidying any database in which a large number of pages have been converted. You can obtain a list of databases that may need tidying by specifying the -showTidy option.
Specifying the -convertObjects and -from none options enable you to use ConvertFormat as a tool alternative for converting objects in a container, database, or federated database after schema evolution has been performed.
   
 
CreateBackupSet
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Creates a backup set for the specified federated database.
CreateBackupSet
-set setName
[-standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-set setName
Name of the backup set to be created.
-standalone
Nonconcurrent mode. Use this option if no lock server is running or to bypass a running lock server.
Warning: Corruption can occur if concurrent access to the federated database is attempted while any process is using this mode.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all normal program output.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database to be archived.
Discussion 
You need to create a backup set explicitly only if you are planning to perform customized backups. When you perform basic backups, Objectivity/DB creates any required backup sets implicitly.
See also 
DeleteBackupSet
QueryBackupSet
CreateFd
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Creates a federated database, including the system-database file and the boot file.
objy CreateFd
-fdName fdSysName
[[-fdDirHost fdDirHost] -fdDirPath fdDirPath]
[-lockServerHost lockServerHost]
[[-jnlDirHost jnlDirHost] -jnlDirPath jnlDirPath]
[-licenseFile fileName]
[-noPlacement]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
Options 
-fdName fdSysName
System name for the new federated database. fdSysName must conform to your operating system’s naming rules for files, and must be between 1 and 127 characters long inclusive.
-fdDirHost fdDirHost
Data-server host of the new system-database file and boot file. If you omit this option, the default host is:
The current host, if -fdDirPath specifies a local path.
The host implied by -fdDirPath, if an NFS mount name is specified.
If -fdDirPath specifies a Windows UNC share name, fdDirHost is set to the literal string oo_local_host; any value you specify is ignored.
-fdDirPath fdDirPath
Path of the directory for the new system-database file and boot file on the designated host. If the -fdDirHost option specifies a remote system, fdDirPath must be full, not relative. If you omit both -fdDirHost and -fdDirPath, the files are created in the current directory.
-lockServerHost lockServerHost
Host of the lock server servicing the new federated database.
-jnlDirHost jnlDirHost
Host of the new federated database’s journal directory. If you omit this option, the default host is:
The current host, if -jnlDirPath specifies a local path.
The host implied by -jnlDirPath, if an NFS mount name is specified.
The same as fdDirHost, if -jnlDirPath is also omitted.
If -jnlDirPath specifies a Windows UNC share name, jnlDirHost is set to the literal string oo_local_host; any value you specify is ignored.
-jnlDirPath jnlDirPath
Path to the new federated database’s journal directory. If the -jnlDirHost option specifies a remote system, jnlDirPath must be full, not relative.
If you omit both the -jnlDirHost and -jnlDirHost options, the default journal-directory path is fdDirPath.
-licenseFile fileName
File containing the Objectivity license for the new federated database. You may optionally include a path to the directory containing the file; if you specify a filename without a path, the file must reside in the current directory.
If you omit this option, CreateFd uses the default license file oolicense.txt in fdDirPath. If no default license file is found there, CreateFd looks for it in the following location:
(Windows) Objectivity/DB installation directory installDir
(Linux) Your home directory; otherwise, the Objectivity/DB installation directory installDir
An error is reported and CreateFd terminates if no license file is found.
-noPlacement
(For backward compatibility only) Causes CreateFd to create a non-placement managed federated database. If you omit this option, CreateFd creates a placement-managed federated database.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
The specified system name fdSysName is used as the simple name of the federated database’s system-database file and boot file. The boot file is created in the same directory as the system-database file. Once a federated database is created, you cannot change its system name, although you can use ChangeFd to change the name or location of one or both files.
The new federated database is placement-managed, which means it has an initial placement model installed; see Placement Model. All applications accessing this federated database must allow Objectivity/DB to implicitly manage the placement of persistent objects, including the creation of containers and databases. For backward compatibility, you can create a non-placement-managed federated database by specifying the -noPlacement option.
A lock server should be running on lockServerHost while you run CreateFd. If the lock server is stopped, the federated database is created anyway, but its identifier is not guaranteed to be unique.
The storage-page size of the system database is 8192 bytes.
See also 
Creating a Federated Database
DeleteBackupSet
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Deletes a backup set and all information in the backup diary about the backups associated with that set.
DeleteBackupSet
-set setName
[-procFiles programName]
[-standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFilebootFilePath
Options 
-set setName
Name of the backup set to be deleted. Deleting a backup set deletes all of the backup events in it.
-procFiles programName
Executes the shell script or program programName before deleting the backup volume. programName can contain a full or relative path.
During the execution of DeleteBackupSet, the name of the file about to be deleted is passed to the script as a command-line argument. If the script exits with a nonzero status, DeleteBackupSet reports an error, but continues processing.
-standalone
Nonconcurrent mode. Use this option if no lock server is running or to bypass a running lock server.
Warning: Corruption can occur if concurrent access to the federated database is attempted while any process is using this mode.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all normal program output.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database.
Discussion 
To delete a basic backup (a backup taken with options such as -full, -incremental, -subincremental, or -destination), you must first use the QueryBackupSet tool to find the name of the backup set that was implicitly created for the backup you want to delete. You then use the -set option to specify this backup set name to DeleteBackupSet.
The DeleteBackupSet tool deletes backup-set information from the federated database only; the associated backup volumes are not deleted from the file system. If you want to delete the volumes as well, it is your responsibility to identify the volumes associated with the unwanted set (for example, by running the QueryBackupSet tool), and then delete the volumes using an operating system command.
See also 
CreateBackupSet
QueryBackupSet
DeleteDb
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Deletes a database from a federated database.
DeleteDb
-db dbSysName | -id dbId | -all
[-catalogOnly]
[-standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-db dbSysName
System name of the database to be deleted.
In a placement-managed federated database, you may not delete a database if it contains internal data maintained by the placement model.
-id dbId
Integer identifier of the database to be deleted (for example, 78). This option also accepts the identifier specified in D-C-P-S format (for example, 78-0-0-0).
In a placement-managed federated database, you may not delete a database if it contains internal data maintained by the placement model.
-all
Removes all databases from the specified federated database.
In a placement-managed federated database, a database is skipped if it contains internal data maintained by the placement model.
-catalogOnly
(For backward compatibility only) Removes the database from the federated database’s global catalog, without deleting the database file. If you specify this option when deleting databases in a placement-managed federated database, the tool reports an error and terminates.
-standalone
Strict nonconcurrent mode. Use this option only if the lock server for the specified federated database is stopped. If the lock server is running, the tool reports an error and terminates.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database from which the specified database is to be deleted.
Discussion 
If the database file exists, all bidirectional relationships (associations) and unidirectional relationships (associations) to objects in other databases are removed. The database file is then deleted, along with the files of any external containers belonging to the database.
A read-only database must be changed to read/write before you can delete it.
You may delete a database only if the database contains application-created data. Doing so automatically updates the object-placement information stored in the federated database. This tool reports an error and terminates if you attempt to delete a database that contains internal data maintained by the federated database’s placement model.
DeleteFd
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Deletes a federated database, including the system-database file, boot file, and database files.
DeleteFd
[-standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-standalone
Strict nonconcurrent mode. Use this option only if the lock server for the specified federated database is stopped. If the lock server is running, the tool reports an error and terminates.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database to delete.
Discussion 
Before deleting a federated database, you must ensure that no locks are being held within any of its databases. Consequently, you should:
Ensure that no active transactions exist against the federated database.
Recover any abnormally completed transactions (for example, using CleanupFd).
DO
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Executes one or more DO statements to query, create, or update the data in the specified federated database; also called DO runner.
DO
([-statement statement] | [-inFile fileName])
[-outFile fileName]
[-outputFormat format]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-statement statement
One or more DO statements to be executed. The entire argument must be enclosed in double quotation marks. For example the following shows two DO statements submitted as a single -statement argument:
-statement "FROM Person RETURN name; DELETE Person WHERE name == 'Joe Smith' RETURN name;"
You can omit both the -statement and -inFile options to use DO interactively.
-inFile fileName
Name of a file containing the DO statement or statements to be executed. You may optionally include a path to the directory containing the file; if you do not include a path, the file must reside in the directory in which you run the tool. By convention, the filename extension is .do, but this is not required.
Within the file, multiple DO statements may be on the same line or on separate lines, and are not enclosed in quotation marks.
You can omit both the -inFile and -statement options to use DO interactively.
-outFile fileName
Name of the file in which to write the result of the executed DO statements. You may optionally include a path to an existing directory in which to create the output file; if you do not include a path, the output file is created in the directory in which you ran the tool. You may, but need not, provide a filename extension.
You can omit this option to send all output to stdout.
-outputFormat format
Format in which to print the result of the executed DO statement(s).
DO (Default.) DO object-structure format, suitable for using as input to another DO statement. Each returned object is presented as follows:
@className{attributeValue, ..., attributeValue}
Table Tabular format, suitable for loading into a spreadsheet for post-processing. Each returned object is a table row with a column for each returned attribute value. Limitation: Attribute values that are collections, references, or embedded objects are not expanded, but are instead indicated as follows: {...}
JSON JSON format, suitable for using as input to programs that process JSON.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database containing the data to be processed by the specified DO statement(s).
Discussion 
This tool parses and evaluates one or more statements written in the DO language, and returns the result of each executed statement. The DO language is a declarative language for querying, creating, or updating objects in a federated database. For information about constructing DO statements, see Declarative Objectivity (DO) Language.
The DO tool accepts DO statements in any of the following ways:
From the command line. Specify the -statement option with one or more statements as a single string argument enclosed in double quotation marks.
From a text file. Specify the -inFile option with the name of a text file containing one or more statements.
Interactively. Omit both the -statement and -inFile options to enter Interactive Mode.
Regardless of how you submit DO statements (by command line, input file, or interactive mode), when multiple statements are submitted, each statement is executed and its output is displayed before processing the next statement.
By default, the result is displayed on the screen. You can save the result to a file by specifying the -outFile option.
By default, the result is formatted using the DO syntax for specifying objects with attribute values. You can request tabular or JSON formatting by specifying the -outputFormat option.
Example 
The following command line executes a DO statement in the specified federated database:
objy DO -statement "FROM Person RETURN name; DELETE Person WHERE name == 'Joe Smith' RETURN name;" -bootFile myData.fdb
Example 
Assume a text file called queries.do contains the following DO statements, which are not enclosed in quotation marks.
// Contents of file queries.do
FROM Person RETURN name;
DELETE Person WHERE name == 'Joe Smith' RETURN name;
The following command executes these statements in the specified federated database and saves the results to a local file called deletedObjects.txt:
objy DO -inFile queries.do -outFile deletedObjects.txt -bootFile myData.fdb
Interactive Mode
Entering interactive mode displays the DO> command-line prompt. To exit interactive mode, enter /EXIT at the DO> prompt.
To submit a DO statement, you type it at the DO> prompt:
You do not need to surround the statement with double quotation marks.
You can optionally press Enter to break an incomplete statement across multiple lines.
You must complete the statement with a semicolon (;) and press Enter to submit it.
During statement execution, lengthy output is displayed one page (window) at a time. You can:
Press Enter to advance to the next page (window) of results.
Press p or P to disable pagination for the remainder of the current query.
Press q or Q or Control-C to terminate the current query and return to the DO> prompt.
While in interactive mode, you can:
Use the up and down arrow keys at the DO> prompt to re-display previously submitted statements.
Enter special commands preceded by a slash (/):
Interactive DO Command
Description
/EXIT
Exits interactive mode (terminates the DO runner).
/OUTPUTFORMAT DO
/OUTPUTFORMAT JSON
/OUTPUTFORMAT Table
Changes the output format of statement results. The behavior is identical to specifying -outputFormat at the command line.
/RECORD filename
Writes statement results to the specified file, in addition to displaying them. You can switch to a different file by entering /RECORD again with the new filename; doing so automatically stops the first recording.
/STOP
Stops the current recording.
Example 
These lines enter interactive mode, submit two DO statements, and exit. Each statement is followed by results, which are not shown.
objy DO -bootFile myData.fdb
DO> FROM Person RETURN name;
...
DO> DELETE Person WHERE name == 'Joe Smith' RETURN name;
...
DO> /EXIT
   
DumpCatalog
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Generates a textual report of the files in a federated database.
DumpCatalog
[-apName apSysName | -apId apId]
[-outFile filename [-exists  delete | quit]]
[-filenameDisplayFormat  hostLocal | native]
[-noLabel]
[-control]
[-standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-apName apSysName
(For backward compatibility only)
-apId apId
(For backward compatibility only)
-outFile fileName
Name of the file in which to write the generated report. You can edit this file to drive a standard backup tool. You can omit this option to send all output to stdout.
-exists delete | quit
Action to take if the file specified with the -outFile option already exists.
delete Overwrites the existing file.
quit Terminates without writing output.
If -exists is omitted, the default action is to quit.
-filenameDisplayFormat hostLocal | native
Format for printing filenames.
hostLocal Filename printed in host format, as hostName::localPath—for example, mach3::/mnt/fred/project/myfd.FDB
native Filename printed as full path using the native operating system’s format—for example, /net/mach3/usr/mnt/project/myfd.FDB
The default value is hostlocal.
-noLabel
Suppresses the labeling of files in the output. By default, each filename in the output is labeled.
-control
(For backward compatibility only)
-standalone
Relaxed nonconcurrent mode. Use this option if no lock server is running or to bypass a running lock server.
Warning: Corruption can occur if concurrent access to the federated database is attempted while any process is using this mode.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database containing the files to be listed.
Discussion 
This tool shows information from the federated database’s global catalog and from the catalogs of any databases that have external containers. These catalogs describe the properties of objects that are physically represented as files—that is, databases and external containers. (Embedded containers are therefore not listed.)
You typically use this tool to inspect the distributed structure of a federated database or to see the locations and other properties of each file-based object. For example, you can use this tool to find out which databases (if any) have been made read-only or to see whether any databases have external containers.
This tool shows catalog information in a simple textual format.
Execute
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Executes the set of tool runner commands in the given text file.
objy Execute
[-inFile fileName]
[-stopOnError]
[-help]
Options 
-inFile fileName
Text file containing one or more tool runner commands on separate lines. Each line should start with the name of the tool and include any required options.
-stopOnError
Terminates immediately when an error is detected. The default is to report errors and continue.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
The input file can include any number of tool runner commands on separate lines. For example, the following shows the contents of an input text file with commands that create an index key specification, create an index specification using that key, then create an index using that index specification:
AddKeySpecification -name myKey -class Member -attribute name -bootfile myFD.boot
 
AddIndexSpecification -name myIndexSpec -keySpecification myKey -class Member -bootfile myFD.boot
 
AddIndex -indexSpecification myIndexSpec -bootfile myFD.boot
 
ListIndexes -bootfile myFD.boot
 
ExportSchema
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Creates an XML document representing the schema of a placement-managed federated database.
objy ExportSchema
-outFile fileName
[-overwrite]
[-includeSystemDefined]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-outFile fileName
Name of the file in which to write the exported XML document. You may optionally include a path to an existing directory in which to create the output file; if you do not include a path, the output file is created in the directory in which you ran the tool. You can omit the .xml filename extension, which is added automatically.
-overwrite
Overwrites an existing file with the same name and in the same location as the generated output file.
-includeSystemDefined
Exports the entire federated-database schema, includng Objectivity/DB internal classes.
By default, this tool exports the set of application-defined classes in the federated database’s schema. Specifying the -includeSystemDefined option produces a larger XML document representing Objectivity/DB internal classes in addition to the application-defined classes.
You can normally omit the -includeSystemDefined option because the destination federated database of an import operation already contains the schema for Objectivity/DB internal classes. You should specify -includeSystemDefined if the federated database of the exported schema was created with a different release of Objectivity/DB than the intended destination federated database.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootfile bootFilePath
Path (including the filename) to the boot file of the federated database to be exported.
Discussion 
This tool exports the schema of a federated database by representing it textually in Extensible Markup Language (XML). More specifically, this tool creates an XML document containing a hierarchy of XML elements representing one or more of the classes described in the federated database’s schema. You can specify this XML document to the ImportSchema tool to transfer the exported schema to a destination federated database.
By default, this tool exports the set of application-defined classes in the schema. You must use the -includeSystemDefined option to export the entire schema, including Objectivity/DB internal classes as well as application-defined classes.
Exporting a schema is the first step of a procedure that synchronizes the schemas of two or more federated databases. You typically synchronize schemas when you want to ensure that all members of a distributed development team are using federated databases with matching schemas.
The set of possible XML elements and their arrangement within an XML document are defined by the XML Schema for Objectivity/DB, which is located in a subdirectory of your Objectivity/DB installation directory (installDir):
installDir/etc/objy.xsd
When you export the schema of a federated database, the resulting XML document contains the following hierarchy of top-level XML elements:
<ObjyXml>
  <Fd>
    <Schema>
      …         <!-- Representations of schema components -->
    </Schema>
  </Fd>
</ObjyXml>
See also 
ImportSchema
FileInfo
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Displays the file type and other information about the specified Objectivity/DB file.
objy FileInfo
-fileName fileName
[-noTitle]
[-help]
Options 
-fileName fileName
Filename of the Objectivity/DB file to be described.
-noTitle
Suppresses the copyright notice and program title banner. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
This tool displays the following information about the specified file:
The file type—Database file, container file, system-database file for a federated database, boot file, or backup file.
The properties for the type of file, such as the identifier, system name, journal-directory host and path, lock-server host, storage-page size, and containing federated database.
The Objectivity/DB release with which the file is compatible. This information is useful when you are upgrading to a new release.
The architecture (platform) that owns the file’s initial storage page (set by the application or tool that created the file).
See also 
ChangeFd
ImportSchema
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Populates a placement-managed federated database with the schema represented in an XML document.
objy ImportSchema
-inFile fileName
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-inFile fileName
Name of the file containing the XML document to be imported. You may optionally include a path to the directory containing the file; if you do not include a path, the file must reside in the directory in which you run the tool.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path (including the filename) to the boot file of the federated database.
Discussion 
This tool interprets the specified Extensible Markup Language (XML) document and populates the schema of the destination federated database accordingly. The specified XML document is normally the output of ExportSchema.
Warning: Always make a backup of your federated database before you perform an import operation.
You can use ImportSchema to fully populate the schema of an empty federated database or to add schema descriptions of new classes to an existing populated federated database.
An import operation may add new items (or new versions of existing items) to a federated database, and never deletes or overwrites existing items.
Note:ImportSchema reports an error and terminates if the imported schema contains any descriptions that would change an existing class in the destination schema.
This tool is valid only for placement-managed federated databases.
See also 
ExportSchema
InstallFd
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Updates the properties of a federated database and its components, after its files have been placed in a new operating environment.
InstallFd
[-lockServerHost lockServerHost]
[-fdName fdSysName]
[-fdNumber fdId]
[[-fdFileHost fdFileHost] -fdFilePath fdFilePath]
[[-dbDirHost dbDirHost] -dbDirPath dbDirPath]
[[-jnlDirHost jnlDirHost] -jnlDirPath jnlDirPath]
[-licenseFile fileName]
[-purgeAps]
[-noCheck]
[-noCatalog]
[-noWait]
[-standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-lockServerHost lockServerHost
Lock-server host for the newly installed federated database. The default is the host on which you are running this tool.
-fdName fdSysName
System name of the newly installed federated database. If you omit this option, the original system name is used.
-fdNumber fdId
(For backward compatibility only) Suggested integer identifier of the newly installed federated database. The maximum identifier is 65533. If you omit this option, the default is the identifier that is specified in the boot file.
The identifier is used only if it is found to be unique among the federated-database identifiers recognized by the lock server; otherwise Objectivity/DB selects a unique identifier to assign.
Note: If -standalone is also specified, Objectivity/DB cannot guarantee a unique identifier for the federated database.
-fdFileHost fdFileHost
Data-server host of the system-database file to be installed. If you omit this option, the default host is:
The current host, if -fdFilePath specifies a local path.
The host implied by -fdFilePath, if an NFS mount name is specified.
The host of the specified boot file, if -fdFilePath is also omitted.
If -fdFilePath specifies a Windows UNC share name, fdFileHost is set to the literal string oo_local_host; any value you specify is ignored.
-fdFilePath fdFilePath
Path (including the filename) to the system-database file to be installed. If the -fdFileHost option specifies a remote system, fdFilePath must be full, not relative.
If you omit both the -fdFilePath and -fdFileHost options, the default path consists of the system-database filename in the directory of the specified boot file (where the system-database filename is extracted from the boot file).
-dbDirHost dbDirHost
Data-server host of the directory containing the data files (database files and any container files) to be installed. If you omit this option, the default host is:
The current host, if -dbDirPath specifies a local path.
The host implied by -dbDirPath, if an NFS mount name is specified.
The host of the specified boot file, if -dbDirPath is also omitted.
If -dbDirPath specifies a Windows UNC share name, dbDirHost is set to the literal string oo_local_host; any value you specify is ignored.
-dbDirPath dbDirPath
Path to the directory containing the data files (database files and any container files) to be installed. If the -dbDirHost option specifies a remote system, dbDirPath must be full, not relative. If you omit both the -dbDirPath and -dbDirHost options, the default is the directory of the specified boot file.
-jnlDirHost jnlDirHost
Host of the journal directory for the newly installed federated database. If you omit this option, the default host is:
The current host, if -jnlDirPath specifies a local path.
The host implied by -jnlDirPath, if an NFS mount name is specified.
The host of the specified boot file, if -jnlDirPath is also omitted.
If -jnlDirPath specifies a Windows UNC share name, jnlDirHost is set to the literal string oo_local_host; any value you specify is ignored.
-jnlDirPath jnlDirPath
Path to the journal directory for the newly installed federated database. If the -jnlDirHost option specifies a remote system, jnlDirPath must be full, not relative. If you omit both the -jnlDirHost and -jnlDirPath options, the default is the directory of the specified boot file.
-licenseFile fileName
File containing the license to be placed in the newly installed federated database. You may optionally include a path to the directory containing the license file; if you specify a filename without a path, the license file must reside in the current directory.
If you omit this option, the installed federated database keeps its current license.
-purgeAps
(For backward compatibility only)
-noCheck
Continues the installation even if a data file cannot be found in the location specified by dbDirHost and dbDirPath. By default, InstallFd terminates if any expected data file cannot be found there.
-noCatalog
(Reserved for future use)
-noWait
Causes the tool to terminate immediately if the federated database is currently being accessed by another process.
-standalone
Strict nonconcurrent mode. Use this option only if the lock server for the specified federated database is stopped. If the lock server is running, the tool reports an error and terminates.
Note: If you use this option, Objectivity/DB cannot guarantee a unique identifier for the federated database.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database to be installed.
Discussion 
You use this tool when setting up a federated database after its files have been placed in a new operating environment, such as a new host. This tool is typically used by an end user who has received the files of a deployed federated database, by a QA engineer who has received federated-database files for testing, or by a technical-support engineer who has received federated-database files from a customer for troubleshooting.
Note:Due to a current limitation, this tool installs only federated databases whose database files were originally created in a single directory.
No preparation of the federated-database files is required, other than placing its system-database file in the desired location and placing all data files (that is, all database files and any container files) in a single directory. This tool updates the properties of the federated database and its data files to reflect the new locations.
License
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Displays a license in either the specified federated database or in the specified directory, and optionally, updates the license of a federated database.
License
[(-licenseFile fileName | -fromDefault)[-toDefault]]
[-standalone]
[-noAutoRecover]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-licenseFile fileName
File containing the new license. You may optionally include a path to the directory containing the file; if you specify a filename without a path, the file must reside in the current directory.
-fromDefault
Obtains the new license from the default license file oolicense.txt. The tool first looks for the default file in the bootFilePath directory. If the default file is not found there, License looks in the following location:
(Windows) Objectivity/DB installation directory installDir
(Linux) Your home directory; otherwise, the Objectivity/DB installation directory installDir
License reports an error and terminates if no license file is found.
-toDefault
Prints the contents of the license file located in the directory specified by the -licenseFile or -fromDefault option.
If you specify the -toDefault option, you must also specify either the -licenseFile or -fromDefault option.
Note: When you use the -toDefault option, the command ignores the -bootFile option.
-standalone
Relaxed nonconcurrent mode. Use this option if no lock server is running or to bypass a running lock server.
Warning: Corruption can occur if concurrent access to the federated database is attempted while any process is using this mode.
-noAutoRecover
(For advanced users only.) Suppresses automatic recovery. You may need to perform manual recovery of locks.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath 
Path to a boot file of the federated database to be licensed.
Note: This option is ignored if you use the -toDefault option.
Discussion 
To display a readable (unencrypted) version of the federated database’s current license to stdout, enter License with just the -bootFile option.
To update the license in a federated database, use either the -licenseFile or -fromDefault option to specify the new license. The new license completely replaces the federated database’s previous license. License reports the identifiers of both the new and the replaced licenses.
Every federated database must have a license before you can access it with a tool or application. You can use the License tool to:
Update a licensed federated database with a renewed or changed license.
Upgrade an unlicensed federated database that was created before Objectivity/DB required licenses.
To display the contents of a license file in a directory, enter License with the -toDefault option, along with either the -licenseFile or the -fromDefault option.
ListOperators
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Lists the operators supported by the DO query language.
ListOperators
[-categories] | [-category category]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
Options 
-categories
Lists the categories you can specify to the -category operator.
-categories category
Lists the operators in the specified category.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
The DO query language supports a wide variety of operators, including arithmetic, bitwise, logical, mathematic, string, and the like.
For a list of all supported operators, enter:
objy ListOperators
Hint: Use operating system conventions to save the tool output to a file or display the output a screenful at a time.
For a list of categories into which operators are subdivided, enter:
objy ListOperators -categories
For a list of operators in a particular category such as DateTime, enter:
objy ListOperator -category DateTime
The entry for each operator provides:
A brief description of the operator
The DO token, which is the actual symbol or word you use to specify the operator in an expression
The type of value returned by the operator
A description of each operand, including its type
ListSystemValues
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Lists the system values supported by the DO query language.
ListSystemValues
[-categories] | [-category category]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
Options 
-categories
Lists the categories you can specify to the -category operator.
-categories category
Lists the system values in the specified category.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
The DO query language supports a number of system values, which are values produced by the DO system or from the computer on which DO is running. Within the DO query language, a system value has the $$ prefix—for example, $$NOW.
For a list of all supported system values, enter:
objy ListSystemValues
Hint: Use operating system conventions to save the tool output to a file or display the output a screenful at a time.
For a list of categories into which system values are subdivided, enter:
objy ListSystemValues -categories
For a list of system values in a particular category such as DateTime, enter:
objy ListSystemValues -category DateTime
The entry for each operator provides:
A brief description of the operator
The DO token, which, when prefixed with $$, is the actual symbol or word you use to specify the operator in an expression
The type of value returned by the system value
ListWait
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Displays information about waiting transactions.
ListWait
[-transaction id | ([-host hostName] [-user userId])]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
[-bootFile bootFilePath | -lockServerHost hostName]
Options 
-transaction id
Checks the status of the specified transaction.
-host hostName
Lists the status of all waiting transactions started on the specified host, subject to filtering based on other options. This option defaults to all nodes.
-user userId
Lists the status of all waiting transactions started by the specified user, subject to filtering based on other options. This option defaults to all users.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath 
Path to a boot file specifying the lock server to be queried. This option causes the output to list just the transactions that are waiting for resources in the specified federated database.
-lockServerHost hostName
Host running the lock server to be queried. This option causes the output to list transactions that are waiting for resources in any of the federated databases serviced by the designated lock server.
Discussion 
This tool queries the designated lock server to check for waiting transactions started by a specified user or host. Such transactions may be waiting on any kind of lockable Objectivity/DB object (federated database, database, or container).
You can optionally use this tool to find out whether a particular transaction is waiting for a lockable object, and if so, which other transactions currently hold the lock on that object.
The way you designate the lock server affects the scope of the output:
Specify -bootFile to list just the transactions that are waiting for resources in the specified federated database.
Specify -lockServerHost to list transactions that are waiting for resources in any of the federated databases serviced by the designated lock server.
The following table summarizes how to use the various options to view different types of transaction information.
To View
Use This Option
All waiting transactions
(no options)
Waiting transactions started on a specific host system
‑host
Waiting transactions started by a specific user
‑user
Waiting transactions started by a specific user on a specific host system
‑host and ‑user
A specific transaction’s status, and any transactions that are using resources that it needs
‑transaction
Locks reported for objects of type M are internally used locks of short duration that manage access to page maps in containers. They are sometimes called latches.
LockMonitor
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Lists all processes and locks currently managed by a lock server.
LockMonitor
-host hostName | -bootFile bootFilePath
[-detail]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
Options 
-host hostName
Host on which the desired lock server is running. If you specify this option, you must omit the -bootFile option. Specifying the -host option is convenient when a boot file is not available or its location is not known.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database whose lock server is to be queried. You can omit this option if you specify the -host option.
-detail
Displays intention locks. An intention lock is a special kind of lock placed on a database or federated database when you request access to it. An intention lock simply indicates that the transaction may also hold a read, update, or exclusive lock lower in the storage hierarchy.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
This tool reports the state of the specified lock server. The LockMonitor tool displays the requested information in a table that includes:
The transaction identifier of the transaction that obtained the lock
The lock mode—read or update
The type of locked object—federated database, database, or container
The federated database, database, and container identifiers (if relevant) of the locked object
Locks reported for objects of type M are internally used locks of short duration that manage access to page maps in containers. They are sometimes called latches.
QueryBackupSet
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Displays information about one or more full backups, along with any incremental and subincremental backups based on them.
QueryBackupSet
[-time dateTime | ‑set setName]
[-quiet]
[-standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-time dateTime
Time of the full backup whose information is to be displayed. You can omit dateTime value to specify the current time, which displays information about the most recent full backup. If no full backup corresponds exactly to the specified time, QueryBackupSet selects the latest full backup that was started prior to the specified time.
You specify dateTime as you would for Restore—as an integer YYYYMMDDHHmm containing up to 12 digits representing component times. For example, 2001051502 specifies May 15, 2001 at 2:00 A.M.
If you specify this option, you may not also specify the -set option.
-set setName
Name of the backup set whose information is to be displayed.
If you specify this option, you may not also specify the -time option.
-quiet
Suppresses all normal program output.
-standalone
Nonconcurrent mode. Use this option if no lock server is running or to bypass a running lock server.
Warning: Corruption can occur if concurrent access to the federated database is attempted while any process is using this mode.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database whose backup set is to be queried.
Discussion 
To display information about basic backups (backups taken with options such as -full, -incremental, -subincremental, or -destination), you specify the -time option. This causes QueryBackupSet to display information for the most recent full backup prior to the specified time, along with any incremental backups based on it.
To display information about customized backups (backups taken with the options -set, -backupName, -device, and -volume), you specify the -set option. This causes QueryBackupSet to display information for the backups in the specified backup set.
If you omit both the -set and -time options, QueryBackupSet displays information about the backups in all backup sets, including any backup sets you created explicitly for customizable backups and any backup sets created implicitly for basic backups.
For each backup listed, QueryBackupSet displays the backup event name, the level, the backup volume capacity, the time stamp, the volume name prefix, and the path to the disk directory where the backup files were written.
The QueryBackupSet command displays information from the federated database’s backup diary. Restoring a federated database to an earlier backup reverts the backup diary to an earlier version. Consequently, the backups listed by QueryBackupSet for a restored federated database may be a subset of the backups that actually exist.
See also 
CreateBackupSet
DeleteBackupSet
Restore
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Restores a federated database previously archived using Backup.
Restore
([-time timeOfRestore] [-source backupDir])
      | (-set setName -backupName backupName -volume volName
       
-device deviceSpecifier)
[-quiet]
[-exists delete | quit]
[-procfilesbef befProgName]
[-procfilesaft aftProgName]
[[-newHost targetHost] -newDirectory targetDir [-failOnly]
| -mapFile mapFile ]
[-dumpCatalog]
[-purgeAps]
[-standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
-bootFile backupBootFilePath
Options 
-time timeOfRestore
Time of the backup from which the federated database is to be restored. The default is the current time, which causes the most recent backup contained in backupDir to be restored.
If no backup in backupDir corresponds exactly to timeOfRestore, Restore selects the latest backup in backupDir that was started prior to the specified time. If the selected backup is incremental, Restore restores both the selected backup and the full backup on which it is based. Similarly, if the selected backup is subincremental, Restore restores the selected backup along with the incremental and full backups on which it is based.
You specify timeOfRestore as an integer YYYYMMDDHHmm containing up to 12 digits representing component times as follows:
YYYY Year
MM Month of the year (01 to 12). For example, 02 is February.
DD Day of the month (01 to 31).
HH Hour of the day (00 to 23). For example, 00 is 12:00 midnight,
01 is 1:00 A.M., 13 is 1:00 P.M., and 23 is 11:00 P.M.
mm Minute of the hour (00 to 59)
Do not insert spaces or delimiters between the component digits. You can truncate digits (or specify 0’s) from right to left, to omit any irrelevant (or unspecified) detail. For example:
201005 Specifies 12:00 A.M. on May 1, 2010. You could use this timeOfRestore to select the most recent backup in backupDir that was started before May 2010.
20100515 Specifies 12:00 A.M. on May 15, 2010. You could use this timeOfRestore to select the most recent backup in backupDir that was started before May 15, 2010.
This option may be used with the -source option.
-source backupDir
Full path to the disk directory containing the files for the backup to be restored. The default is to search the current directory (the directory in which you are executing Restore) for the backup to be restored.
This option may be used with the -time option.
-set setName
Name of the backup set containing the backup event representing the point of restore. This option must be used with the -backup, -volume, and -device options.
-backupName backupName
Name of the backup event representing the point of restore. This option must be used with the -set, -volume, and -device options.
-volume volName
Volume name prefix of the backup volumes containing the data to be restored. This option must be used with the -set, -backup, and -device options.
-device deviceSpecifier
Full path to the disk directory containing the backup volumes to be restored. For example, if the value for deviceSpecifier is /dba/backups and the value for volName is fdb020492, then the actual disk filename for the first backup volume is /dba/backups/fdb020492_1.
This option must be used with the -set, -backup, and -volume options.
-quiet
Suppresses all normal program output.
-exists delete | quit
Action to take if a file already exists with the same name and in the same location as a data file being restored.
delete Overwrites the existing file.
quit Terminates without writing output.
If -exists is omitted, the default action is to quit.
-procfilesbef befProgName
Executes the shell script or program befProgName before each backup volume is opened for read access by Restore. befProgName can contain a full or relative path. The name of the volume to be read is passed to the script as a command-line argument. If befProgName exits with a nonzero status, Restore reports an error and terminates immediately.
-procfilesaft aftProgName
Executes the shell script or program aftProgName after Restore finishes reading each backup volume. aftProgName can contain a full or relative path. If aftProgName exits with a nonzero status, Restore reports an error and terminates immediately.
-newHost targetHost
(Reserved for future use)
-newDirectory targetDir
(Reserved for future use)
-failOnly
(Reserved for future use)
-mapFile mapFile
(Reserved for future use)
-dumpCatalog
Displays catalog information from the federated database at the specified point of restore. This information includes the system names of databases, original file locations, and the original journal-directory property.
The system-database file for the federation is temporarily restored to the current working directory and then deleted. You are prompted if the temporary file will overwrite any file already there.
Warning: Do not run Restore with this option in a directory that already contains any system-database files.
Restore always runs in standalone mode when this option is used since no usable federated database is generated.
-purgeAps
(For backward compatibility only) .
-standalone
Nonconcurrent mode. Use this option if no lock server is running or to bypass a running lock server.
Warning: Corruption can occur if concurrent access to the federated database is attempted while any process is using this mode.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile backupBootFilePath
Path identifying the federated database to be restored from the specified backup.
This path must match the backupBootFilePath that was specified to Backup when the backup was created. Restore simply compares backupBootFilePath to a string saved in the backup. The specified path need not resolve to an existing file (typically because the backup boot file no longer exists in its original location or because you are running Restore in a different directory than Backup). As long as the necessary backup volumes are accessible and undamaged, the condition of the boot file or the boot-file host does not affect the restore.
Discussion 
When restoring a basic backup (a backup taken with options such as -full, -incremental, -subincremental, or -destination), you must perform a basic restore. To do so, you simply specify a point of restore (-time) and the directory containing the backup to be restored (-source). If you omit these options, the most recent backup in the current directory is restored.
When restoring a customized backup (a backup taken with the options -set, -backup, -device, and -volume), you must perform a customized restore. To do so, you must specify the backup set name (-set), the backup event name (-backup), the volume name (-volume), and the full directory path (-device) of the backup event representing the point of restore.
Restore restores data files to their original locations.
The backup boot file is restored to the current working directory (the directory in which you run the tool). If a file with the same name as the backup boot file already exists in the current working directory, Restore reports an error and terminates.
This behavior safeguards your current backup boot file from the possibility of being accidentally overwritten by a restored version of the file. You can specify -exists delete to allow the backup boot file to be overwritten.
Restoring a federated database automatically consolidates fragmented space, so the restored files may be significantly smaller than the original files.
See also 
Backup
StartAms
 
Starts the Advanced Multithreaded Server (AMS) on the current host.
StartAms
[-numThreads number]
[-port number]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
Options 
-numThreads number
Number of threads the server should use to process concurrent client requests, specified as an integer greater than 0. The maximum value is 64 on Windows, and 1000 on Linux.
If you omit this option, the server uses a number of threads that is based on the number of processors in the host machine.
-port number
TCP/IP port used by AMS. This port number is used by remote applications when communicating with AMS. If you omit this option, a default AMS port is assigned by Objectivity/DB.
When specifying a nondefault TCP/IP port number:
(Windows) Choose a port number between 5000 and 65535.
(Linux) Choose a number that is greater than 1024.
(Linux) If AMS is installed as a service, you should set the AMS port through the /etc/services file.
Note: You must use the same port on every host that runs AMS.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
If AMS is already running, an error is reported. Only one AMS process per version of AMS can run on any one system.
You generally run AMS as a service. On Linux, you can use the particular platform’s mechanism for starting services (such as startup scripts, configuration files, and so forth) to start AMS.
AMS can also be started manually from a command prompt. On Windows, you must start the command prompt as an administrator.
Note:For details about configuring AMS as a service, see the installation and configuration documentation for your platform on the Objectivity Developer Network.
See also 
StopAms
StartLockServer
 
Starts a lock server on the current host, optionally starting the lock server’s recovery monitor as well.
StartLockServer
[{-recoverBootFile bootFilePath}]
[-monitor [-timeout seconds] [-interval seconds]
[-testPort port] ]
[-port number]
[-numThreads number]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
Options 
-recoverBootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database to be recovered when the lock server is started. You can specify this option multiple times to specify multiple federated databases. If you omit a federated database that is serviced by the lock server, that federated database is recovered the first time it is accessed by an application.
-monitor
Enables the lock server’s recovery monitor.
The recovery monitor is a thread within the lock server that periodically identifies its transactions and checks whether these transactions still belong to connected processes on operational client hosts. If the recovery monitor determines that any client host has failed (for example, due to machine or network problems), the lock server automatically recovers all transactions started by processes on that host (equivalent to running the CleanupFd tool with the -deadHost option). The recovery monitor also recovers incomplete transactions started by processes (on any client host) that are known to no longer be running.
The recovery monitor’s behavior is controlled by the -timeout, -interval, and -testPort options.
You can see whether the lock server’s recover monitor is enabled by running the CheckLs tool.
-timeout seconds
Number of seconds that the recovery monitor should wait to receive a response from a client host before concluding that the host has failed (for example, due to machine or network problems). If you omit this option, the recovery monitor waits 30 seconds.
The specified value should be at least as long as the network timeout period used by the client applications (see Lock-Server Timeout and AMS Timeout; see also the documentation for your Objectivity/DB programming interface).
This option has no effect unless the -monitor option and one or more -recoverBootFile options are specified.
The recovery monitor checks whether a client host is operational by attempting to make a network connection to the host and waiting for a response within the specified timeout period.
-interval seconds
Number of seconds that the recovery monitor should wait before it checks again for dead client hosts. If you omit this option, the recovery monitor attempts to contact client hosts with active transactions every 60 seconds.
This option has no effect unless the -monitor option and one or more -recoverBootFile options are specified.
-testPort port
TCP/IP port number used by the recovery monitor to contact a client host to check whether the host is operational. The same port number is used on all client hosts.
If you omit this option, the lock-server port is used. This port number is normally sufficient, although at some sites you may need to specify a different port number—for example, to get through a network firewall. The port is used only to establish contact; no data is read or written through it, and it is not necessary for a lock server to be running on that port.
This option has no effect unless the -monitor option and one or more -recoverBootFile options are specified.
-port number
TCP/IP port used by the lock server. This port number is used by remote applications when communicating with the lock server. If you omit this option, a default lock-server port is assigned by Objectivity/DB.
When specifying a nondefault TCP/IP port number:
(Windows) Choose a port number between 5000 and 65535.
(Linux) Choose a number that is greater than 1024.
(Linux) If the lock server is installed as a service, you should set the lock-server port through the /etc/services file.
See Changing the TCP/IP Port for the Lock Server.
-numThreads number
Number of threads the lockserver should use to process concurrent client requests, specified as an integer greater than 0. The maximum value is 64 on Windows, and 255 on Linux.
If you omit this option, the lock server uses a number of threads that is based on the number of processors or processor equivalents (such as a CPU core or a logical CPU), as reported by the lock-server host’s operating system. You can see how many threads the lock server is using by running the CheckLs tool.
You may need to experiment to determine the optimal number of threads. In general, there is no advantage to using more threads than the hardware is capable of executing simultaneously, or using more threads than the expected number of concurrent client transactions. An excessive number of threads can degrade performance.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
Restarting the lock server after a lock-server failure performs automatic recovery on the federated databases specified by the -recoverBootFile option(s).
You can optionally enable the lock server’s recovery monitor to automatically clean up any transactions that belong to a process that was running on a failed client host.
You generally StartLockServer as a service. On Linux, you use the particular platform’s mechanism for starting services (such as startup scripts, configuration files, and so forth) to start the lock server.
The lock server can also be started manually from a command prompt. On Windows, you must start the command prompt as an administrator.
Note:For details about configuring the lock server as a service, see the installation and configuration documentation for your platform on the Objectivity Developer Network.
A lock server grants locks on resources (containers, databases, or federated databases) to requesting transactions. Each transaction can lock multiple resources, and a given resource can be locked by multiple transactions.
In general, a lock server cannot be started on a workstation that is already running a lock server. However, it is possible for a lock server from the current release of Objectivity/DB to run on the same workstation as a lock server from certain older releases of Objectivity/DB. If a federated database specifies such a workstation as its lock-server host, you must guarantee that all applications accessing that federated database have been built with the same release of Objectivity/DB (so that they will all contact the same lock server).
Warning: Data corruption will occur if two applications built with different releases contact different lock servers while accessing data in the same federated database.
See also 
CheckLs
StartRESTServer
 
Starts the Objectivity REST server for the given federated database on the current host.
StartRESTServer
(-fdAlias alias -configFile configFilepath | -bootFile bootFilePath)
[-port number]
[-logDir logDir]
[-help]
Options 
-fdAlias alias
Alias for a federated database that is designated in the configuration file specified with -configFile, or the full path to the boot file for a federated database. If you provide the alias, you must also provide the configuration file.
-configFile configFilePath
Path to an XML configuration file that provides aliases for one or more federated databases.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database to be hosted by the REST server.
[-port number]
Port number on which to run the Objectivity REST server. The default value is 8185.
[-logDir logDir]
Path to the directory in which log files will be written. You can use the special dot character (.) to specify the current directory. If you omit this option, log files are created in installDir/logs/RESTServer, which requires administrative privileges.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
You can start the Objectivity REST server by providing a single argument, which is the path to the bootfile of a federated database. Alternatively, you can supply a configuration file with aliases and paths for multiple federated databases.
Using a configuration file lets you send REST commands to different federated databases through the use of a URL parameter; see Configuring the REST Server below.
If you do not specify a directory for logging, files are created in installDir/logs/RESTServer, which requires administrative privileges.
Example 
Starts the REST server for the given federated database on the default port:
objy StartRESTServer -bootFile data/rental.boot
Starts the REST server using the rental alias in the configuration file named my.config:
objy StartRESTServer -fdAlias rental -configFile my.config
Configuring the REST Server
You can configure the Objectivity REST server at startup by providing an XML configuration file. The following shows a sample configuration file that uses all available elements.
<Objectivity>
  <FederatedDatabases>      
    <!-- Provide a shortcut name and boot file path for each FD -->
    <FederatedDatabase fdAlias="test"  bootFile="testFD.boot" />
    <FederatedDatabase fdAlias="rental"  bootFile="data/rentalCo.boot" />
  </FederatedDatabases>
  <PortNumber value="8187" />   <!-- If omitted, default value is 8185 -->
  <MinThreads value="20" />     <!-- If omitted, default value is 10 -->
  <MaxThreads value="40" />     <!-- If omitted, default value is 30 -->
</Objectivity>
You can use an alias from the configuration file as a URL parameter when sending Objectivity REST requests. For example, the following sends a request to get the schema for the federated database whose alias is test in the configuration file.
curl -X GET -H "Accept:application/json" localhost:8185/v1/schema?fdAlias=test
See also 
CheckRESTServer
StopRESTServer
StopAms
 
Stops the Advanced Multithreaded Server (AMS) on the specified host, provided that there are no client applications using it. If client applications are running, an error is reported.
StopAms
[-hostName hostName]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
Options 
-hostName hostName
Name of the host system on which the AMS process is running. You can omit this option to stop any AMS process running on the local host (the host on which you are running this tool).
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
See also 
StartAms
StopLockServer
 
Stops the lock server on the specified host.
StopLockServer
[-hostName lockServerHost]
[-noTitle]
[-help]
Options 
-hostName lockServerHost
Name of the host system on which the lock server is running. You can omit this option to stop a lock-server process running on the local host (the host on which you are running this tool).
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
If the lock server is currently servicing active transactions, the lock server refuses to terminate and an error is reported.
StopRESTServer
 
Stops the Objectivity REST server on the current host.
StopRESTServer
[-port number]
[-help]
Options 
[-port number]
Port number where the Objectivity REST server is running. The default value is 8185.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
Discussion 
This tool stops a REST server on the default port of 8185 if a port is not specified.
See also 
StartRESTServer
CheckRESTServer
Tidy
Use: Tool Runner Syntax
Consolidates a fragmented database or federated database.
Tidy
[-db dbSysName | -id dbId]
[[-tmpDirHost hostName] -tmpDirPath dirPath]
[-standalone]
[-noTitle]
[-quiet]
[-help]
-bootFile bootFilePath
Options 
-db dbSysName
System name of the database to be tidied. By default, this tool tidies all databases within the specified federated database.
-id dbId
Integer identifier of the database to be tidied (for example, 78). This option also accepts the identifier specified in D-C-P-S format (for example, 78-0-0-0).
By default, Tidy tidies all databases within the specified federated database.
-tmpDirHost hostName
Host on which to create temporary files. If you omit this option, the default host is:
The host on which you are running this tool, if -tmpDirPath specifies a local path.
The host implied by -tmpDirPath, if an NFS mount name is specified.
If -tmpDirPath specifies a Windows UNC share name, hostName is set to the literal string oo_local_host; any value you specify is ignored.
-tmpDirPath dirPath
Path to the directory on the designated host in which to create temporary files. If the -tmpDirHost option specifies a remote system, dirPath must be full, not relative. If you omit both the -tmpDirHost and -tmpDirPath options, temporary files are created in the directory of each database file being tidied.
-standalone
Strict nonconcurrent mode. Use this option only if the lock server for the specified federated database is stopped. If the lock server is running, the tool reports an error and terminates.
-noTitle
Suppresses just the copyright notice and program title banner, but no other program output. Useful when invoking the tool from a script or application.
-quiet
Suppresses all program output, including the copyright notice and program title banner.
-help
Prints the tool syntax and definition to the screen.
-bootFile bootFilePath
Path to the boot file of the federated database to be tidied.
Discussion 
To hold temporary data files created during its execution, Tidy requires free disk space equal to the size of the federated database or database you are tidying. For more information, see “Tidying a Federated Database” on page 47.
Warning:To prevent potential database corruption, make sure that no other processes access a database or federated database being tidied. (Do not run Tidy and Backup concurrently.)
Warning:Do not run Tidy if you suspect that the federated database has been corrupted. It can make the problem significantly worse.